Verizon Wireless "They're Watching You" as You're Now Their "Person of Interest"

As the hit CBS series "Person of Interest" winds down its run, the line "they're watching you" never rang more true that it does today, especially if you're a Verizon Wireless customer who has installed their mobile app so you can manage your account better.

Unfortunately, the app does more than that, and with the acquisition of AOL, all kinds of "marketing" led initiatives are starting to be unfurled by the telco giant. One of those is the "tracking" of customers physical movements. As one telecom attorney I spoke with about this said, "one would think after the super cookie issue they would know better." But nothing was as damning as the comment to me by a long time Verizon Wireless enterprise facing sales executive. "We know when Google folks visit Salesforce and who they are seeing. That gives us a good indication of what's about to happen." He then went on, "It's (i.e. the tracking) one of the most asked questions we're hearing from enterprise customers..how do I turn it off?"

I learned about this wandering by the Union Station Verizon store in Washington, D.C. two week ago. I was asked by the app what I thought about my experience today in the store. Only problem was I didn't go in the store. The same thing happened as I was having coffee in a cafe next to a Verizon Wireless store in Del Mar, and again after I had walked into the store to ask what they heck was up with the tracking of my movements.

The store rep said, "oh if you don't like to be followed, you can always delete the app." To me that was a stupid, untrained, and ignorant response, but also, pretty straightforward. I then called support and was told to turn off a few things in the app, but they already were. After the rep said she would turn off the marketing functions I checked my phone and found that one of the toggles that had been off, was now on. I immediately turned it off. Then I dug deeper into the Verizon app location setting on the iPhone app management inside the settings app, and there I turned off the actual link between the phone and the app

Candidly, a great app to manage usage and your plan, which was a nice service to have, has been ruined by wanting to know more about the customer than should be known. By forcing an opt-out vs. encouraging an OPT IN, this is a less than desired move by Verizon's leadership to allow this. If it was the first time I've encountered this type of thing from them, I would not be so concerned, but it's not. Back in the early days of data cards, they had Smith Micro create some type of tracking software that wormed its way into your Windows PC. Again, without telling anyone about it. 

Where is all this going? Beacons, sensors and apps on mobile devices can be a good thing. There's some  technology that's coming from companies likeQualcomm that work at the chip set level which could allow marketers to really be smarter in how they deliver messages to customers and prospects, and how employees of companies can be made to be smarter using AI, machine learning, big data and the cloud, but it needs to include some greater degrees of control by the user.  While using mapping software is great, I don't want my every visit to the gym known, or to the ice cream shop later because the next thing you'll see is ice cream being offered at the gym.....The same is do we really want Macy's knowing we were shopping at Bloomingdales, or that I was at the car dealer twice this  past week (with two different Audi's for annual servicing) as that could be misinterpreted as my having car trouble. Next comes the level of encryption of our "data" that's been collected. Of course if Verizon was using the data to install microcells where coverage isn't so great, that would be a useful outcome, but instead of "cells" for coverage they're more interested in what they can "sell" in the way of ads...

To be fair with Verizon, I did call their PR team. All three calls went unreturned..I guess they don't want to talk about it.


Uber Picks UberConference and Dialpad to Modernize Business Communications

Ride sharing service Uber is following Lyft for a change. While Lyft has been using Los Angeles based Telzio as their communications provider, Uber has turned to Dialpad in addition to using UberConference, The choosing of cloud based communications solutions providers is making it far easier for both companies to communicate better internally and get things going faster, as the game changing ride services both expand into new cities and countries around the world.

Dialpad founder Craig Walker told VoipWatch exclusively yesterday, "we started working with Uber as they were heavy users of UberConference for a while before we even launched Dialpad. Both products fit their culture of innovation and disruption, so Dialpad was a natural fit once they started looking for a modern business communications service."

The move to adopt what Walker has labeled "modern business communications" falls well in line with a long belief that disruptive startups, especially those from Silicon Valley, want more and want different in what their telco can provide them and are bypassing the long established companies like AT&T and Verizon.  Instead the newly minted, high growth companies are choosing to embrace the more nimble, service providers that have come on stream post the birth of the cloud era.

These newer companies are the earlier adopters of where businesses are going, and they want services that are easy to deploy and cloud based, just like the way their own businesses are based, using similar service from the likes of Amazon Web Services. So while they still need and require the core features that the traditional telcos provide, these new companies also need modern era features that were birthed by companies like Skype and GrandCentral (Walker sold that to Google and led the transition to GoogleVoice. Google are  now investors in Dialpad) with the online management that Vonage and 8x8 pioneered in telecom.

These new, modern services and the companies delivering them are largely being fueled by API's both public and private. The API's are spawning a new economy, new ways of doing business, and entire ecosystems. That's something that will be well talked about and explored at All About The API, the upcoming conference being held in Las Vegas in July.  An example of how API's work is best seen in the Dialpad app today on the iPhone and iPad. By connecting to an SMS interconnection provider like recent Vonage acquisition Nexmo, Twilio or Syniverse, modern UC companies able to enable SMS to the desktop and from within their apps, much like iMessage or Google Hangouts. The API's allow for the interconnection and interfacing to between customers and the carriers in the middle making them the modern day middleware. 

And, Apple, long resistant to opening up the iOS dialer to Unified Communications providers gave them a big shot in the arm on Monday. At the World Wide Developer Conference Apple announced the opening up of the dialer on the iPhone. This is a significant move as it will allow unified communications providers like Dialpad, Telzio, 8x8 and others to no longer need to use plain vanilla softphones that have been the only way users could interface with UC providers.  Once released the UC players will be able to make use the iPhone's native dialer as the front end for dialing, while allowing their own apps to be where the more customized features are placed.

"Since launching GrandCentral and Google Voice nearly 10 year, we always were frustrated by the inability to make our services work smoothly with the iPhone. The announcement today opens the market up to the type of competition Judge Green envisioned back then. Now businesses again can choose. Of course, I hope they choose Dialpad," said Walker.

The opening up of the iOS dialer by Apple parallels that 1984 decision in opening up the Bell System to alternative long distance carriers. Previously, the only long distance carrier that a caller could use was the one that was aligned with the local Bell operating company, and that was usually AT&T. With the Telecommunications Act of 1984 consumers and businesses were free to choose any long distance carrier. In essence, with Apple opening up the dialer, they are doing the same thing, turning the mobile operator into a pipe. With LTE and LTE-A coming online, those in the more built out mobile high speed data areas will be able to avoid using their mobile operator for voice, and text, and move everything over to the data side where a more feature rich experience will be had.

"This is the missing link that we have been waiting for on iOS ever since the first iPhone came out. Android has had this for years, and Apple did add VoIP specific features a while back such as  battery saving via the background notification feature, but we have been missing the ability to have a VoIP services coexist on an iPhone," said Peter Rank Schrøder, CEO of Telzio. "This will make life much easier for anyone using a secondary number such as a business number, on an iPhone."

Apple's move further makes the mobile operator, the modern day "dumb pipe" something smart entrepreneurs like Walker have been exploiting for years dating back to his days at the original Dialpad, and which new kids on the block like Schrøder are also breaking new ground.

 

 

 


Yahoo Messenger-Going, Going, Almost Gone

For those of you who remember Yahoo Messenger, which was at one point wanting to be able to be like Skype oh so many years ago, it's going to go away. But, don't think it's really gone as last year Yahoo introduced a combined platform that marries WebMessenger with app based Messenger. 

Both Yahoo and Microsoft at times had visions of telephony being part of their respective messenger platforms as noted in the various posts linked to below. Given the interest in messaging bots and platforms one has to wonder if both companies giving up the ghost of messaging came too early, opening up the door to platforms like WhatsApp, Viber, WeChat, LINE, QQ Chat, Kik, Telegram and so many others. 

One of the features of Yahoo Messenger that garnered attention back in the VoIP hey day was it's interoperability with Microsoft Messenger. That functionality was killed off in 2012 after launching in 2006. One can only imagine what may have happened to Messenger had Microsoft not bought Skype.

This makes one wonder how many people are still on AOL's AIM and ICQ, the two biggest forerunners of messaging apps that many of us grew up using.

 


Developer Stats-Can You Buy The Numbers?

According to the S-1 filing by Twilio, they have over 900,000 developers who have registered to use their APIs. Nexmo, according to a Vonage company spokesperson in the IR Department has registered over 114,000 devs and 350 "enterprise" accounts compared to Twilio's 28,000 Active Customer Accounts that are not broken out by category. And if you read the S-1, it's those enterprise accounts that Twilio plans to go after.

But, as the Vonage spokesperson pointed out "these developers may be students who are learning how to code."  That means a large portion of the developers in the aggregate million or so of both companies, not allowing for duplication, between the two services are LPBs (low to no paying buyers). That's something Twilio sort of explains in saying they don't factor in accounts that pay less than $5.00 a month in services fees. In the car industry, those types of customers are known as tire kickers. They factor into the number of people who walk into the dealership or onto the lot but never buy a car. Tire kickers are not buyers, and Car buyers are what is a real customer, so in developer parlance, a customer would be someone who actually deploys and pays for something.

So, 350 companies out of 114,000 developers is .003 percent conversion rate if we chose to treat the enterprise as ONE developer vs. them having say 25 each. For this exercise I won't go to 350 equals one argument, though I could. So, even with 25 devs in each enterprise company then the conversion rate for Nexmo is .077 percent. If those same 350 companies employ 100 devs each then the percentage increases to .30 percent. My guess is the number is somewhere between the .077 and the .30.

Now let's apply the same "math" to Twilio.

900,000 devs and 28,000 paying accounts. That's a conversion rate of .031, so the two companies appear to be far from equal in conversion percentage, but it would appear that Nexmo is clearly making more money per developer, converting more to paying and revenue generating, and carrying a lesser percentage of non or low paying students.

Twilio is projected at a $240,000,000 income level for 2016 if they continue to generate the same amount each quarter. With 900,000 devs that translates to just under $277.00 a developer on average for the year, but with really only 28,000 paying accounts the number grows to $8,571 per paying developer so clearly there's a big difference between the $5.00 a month/$60.00 a year paying dev and the $714 a month outlier. I would say that to be on par with Nexmo, Twilio needs a lot more of the outliers and less of the "students."

Nexmo reported $71 million in revenue with only 114,000 devs or $622 per developer so if I use the model of like to like of total devs for each, Nexmo trumped Twilio by more than 2.5x per registered dev on average. And that's the problem with large numbers and why Twilio had to couch their claims with "only 28,000" being counted.

So, smaller developer base. Higher revenue per developer. An existing base of enterprise customers (that they have to of course keep), the win goes to Nexmo....now all Vonage has to do is keep the customers from going to Twilio, Plivo or any of the API platforms that are on line and also growing.


Dialpad--Life For Old iPads

 

Dialpad_Logo_Vertical_POS_RGBsquare-56de6a322a1c6

Like many of us, I have an iPad Air2 and an iPad Mini in storage. My current iPad is the 9.7 inch iPad Pro, with the keyboard and I find that in many situations I can do most of what I do on my MacBook with it, especially while traveling or sipping an espresso at a cafe. But, really, one iPad was enough, and the older ones became hand me downs or simply sat in the storage drawer. Well, not anymore.

Over the past few weeks, thanks to pal Craig Walker, founder of Dialpad and creator of GoogleVoice (GrandCentral), I was able to put the new DialPad app through its paces on the iPad while the new version of the app was going through TestFlight beta trials.  While I've used Counterpath's Bria and Skype on the iPad before as a way to make and take calls, I never really felt I was having a real "phone" experience. There was always something clunky about the way the call was being handled. Instead I would find myself reaching for the nearest smartphone, as they always seemed to ring first, even with SIM ring functions turned on, with GoogleVoice ringing every inbound number. Finally, I can stop that behavior.

The Dialpad iPad app is very different and may be the best softphone ever created bar none. First off, it rings at the same time as the SIM ring to my mobile phones. Second the audio quality is second to none. On a thirty five minute call with the CEO of a client yesterday not one pop, or drop or anything that one wouldn't have experienced on a cell phone call. Third is the ease of use and very clean, easy to use interface. It's natural and effortless, much like Skype was in its pre-Microsoft days. The consistency between the desktop, smartphone and iPad in look and feel makes it that way. If you are using the desktop app or plug-in, you'll have no learning curve as the UI (user interface) is identical. About the only drawback is the non-ringing when you have the app in the foreground, which is likely an Apple iOS notification issue. In many ways Dialpad's app on the iPad reminded me of the first experience I had with Gizmo, the company acquired by Google that was perhaps along with Truphone, the only real rivals to Skype. The Gizmo app always had this very natural, phone like feel to it, and also had the sound quality that was natural too. 

The fact that I was calling from a tablet reminded me why the old Samsung Galaxy Tab 1.0 with both calling and data was such a great device, just not a great form factor. On the call, I used my wired headset that I use on my iPhone. The call sound was full, rich, robust. There wasn't any hiss or popping. On the other end, not once did my client, ever ask me to repeat what I had said, and he was on a mobile phone in a noisy environment. The large buttons made it easy to hit the mute button, and because of the adjacent "Recent Calls" tab, I was also able to text people who were calling me to let them know I was on a call. 

Candidly, not having mobile phone service in the iPad prior to LTE was always one of the drawbacks, and I always felt Apple should have made the iPad a phone also, with the codecs and chips that would let it really be one. Well, Dialpad has made it just that good. 

About the only thing lacking is video. Dialpad is experimenting with that on their Mac and PC desktop service so my guess is that, and Apple TV integration are not far behind.

If you're using Dialpad on your iPhone, you'll love it on your iPad, and if you're like me, you'll finally be finding use for those older iPad's that are sitting in the drawer somewhere.....


WebRTC - Like Wine, Is Coming of Age

Over the weekend Tsahi Levent-Levi, penned a contributed article over on Venture Beat about WebRTC which I enjoyed reading.

Tsahi, has been deep diving into WebRTC as long as anyone, and perhaps along with Dean Bubley, is one of the better informed blogalysts on the subject, only likely surpassed by long time pal, Counterpath and Hookflash founder, Erik Lagerway when it comes to being as well informed on the technical and aware of the possible. That's why it's always fun to read Tsahi's collection of facts to stay more up to date on things that one may have missed. The article is a very good read so take a few moments and check it out.

In the roundup recap of why it's time to pay attention to WebRTC Tsahi draws out the fact that most of the modern browsers, with the absence of Apple's Safari, have WebRTC included now. This includes Microsoft new browser candidate, Edge. That's all nice, but for me, it's always been having WebRTC embedded in apps and inside new services that mattered most, as the browser is really just the commodity for transport, but it's what WebRTC connects and connects to that's so important.

That's a point that Tsahi makes when he discusses the data channel, something client Temasys' team has been saying for a few years as well and why pal Andy Voss' Sansay has been so busy the past few years making sure their SBC's are WebRTC capable

Take for example two new  offerings Tsahi didn't mention that are now breaking ground that Tsahi didn't mention. Ottspott and Yodel. These apps and services are living where things are going. Inside the Bot and Messaging platforms like Slack and Hipchat that are the future. They both start away from the browsers which is where things are really happening, and where more daily workers are living. Workforces are getting out of being trapped in email and voice mail hell, and to give credit to Skype of old, the workforce of today is yearning for more personal interactivity without the annoyance of being bothered when they can't talk.

With the decline of Skype, post acquisition by Microsoft, as the place everyone has hung out to stay in touch, teams, especially distributed teams and organizations that work across timezone are already turning to platforms like Slack and HipChat. (I would contend that Basecamp, a platform I love is missing the boat with the lack of Real Time Comms beyond their Campfire platform that is in need of an overhaul.)

Slack already has built in calling, and with their API's are enabling cagey development teams to build in even more sophisticated voice tools, like Ottspott and Yodel. Both use Slack to set up or "receive" a call, then spawn a web browser page and use WebRTC to power the conversation. This blend of old and new thinking makes these two companies Voice 3.0 companies.  

And, Slack's voice beta has only gone from good to better as you try it and use it. Now that its been rolled out to their iOS and Android apps, it really is becoming a way to stay in touch and quickly shift from text to voice. For those in well built out LTE areas, or those who live on Wi-Fi, you really don't need a voice plan if you mostly live in the app world with Slack and the voice, conferencing and video services that integrate with it.

But the world is changing right before our eyes and ears...and thanks to watchers like Tsahi, Dean and others, we're all able to stay better aware, informed and involved.


Telcos Are More And More Just Old Pipes

Last month, pal Dean Bubley had a blog post about the rising tide of non-traditional telcos. I tend to agree with Dean (as usual), but not for all the same reasons. The reason telecom is changing is because of where the brain drain is going. In the past getting hired by AT&T, Verizon, BT, France Telecom, Bell Canada was an opportunity to have financial security, an opportunity to work with best and the brightest in the lab, develop new services and be part of the changing landscape within a global industry. 

But at some point, Bell Labs became a thing of the past, the cable companies created CableLabs, third parties like Ericsson, Nokia, Alcatel all took over running parts or all of the modern day telco's wireless networks, in essence outsourcing the management and operations, which in turn drove what is called vendor lock-in. Those companies took the talent from the telcos over onto their payroll, kept the best, shed the rest. That ensured for the Communications Equipment Providers, who have now also became software providers, a steady stream of business, while the telcos moved from operators to really managers of networks, not builders and maintainers, or improvers of them. Add to that, the US operators steady moves to gut the unions by selling off assets that were heavily unionized and you have a cadre of information pipe owners, not innovators.

However the innovation wasn't coming from that sector anyway, it was coming from startups in Silicon Valley and across the USA, Israel, Asia and elsewhere. And, as a result, talent and thinking wasn't going in the direction of the telcos any longer anyway. It's also going to the likes of Amazon, Google and Facebook. It's also residing inside Microsoft and Apple. Twilio is a perfect example of the decoupled telco. Buy the parts and pieces you need, avoid the rest. Companies like Comcast and Cablevision in the USA have long been building their own networks too, looking to leap over and be unencumbered by the telcos and as they too want to be less encumbered, they will be building upon the infrastructure of the likes of Twilio and the Twilio like companies which is why Vonage bought Nexmo, as both a hedge, and as a way to sell very customized services that previously were the realm of the CEPs. 

Once the largest customers of AT&T and Level3, the cable operators in the USA realized early on that their enemy was the telco and that someday, the telcos would be their competition. Just look at AT&T buying DirectTV, Verizon buying AOL, having a property to add to with Go90. This was after the cable companies rolled out VoIP using Level3, the established telco's biggest nemesis for years. 

Amazon's cloud is a big part of the developer's world. And in turn, a major supplier of service to so many businesses that telecom is part of the fabric, without anyone even knowing that Amazon is likely the switching platform for the calls. Using AWS and the other Amazonian infrastructure is powering new services today, that used to be invested in by businesses at all levels. Now, a startup can run on Amazon, hook in Twilio, Nexmo or build their own features and services in on their own. As Dean wrote today,  "telephony and UCaaS do start to look a bit more like today's other SaaS offers - which can be hosted in telcos' own data-centres, but are more often anchored in Microsoft's or Amazon's."

Talent rich teams is no longer the sole domain of the established. The brain drain started as innovation inside the large companies began to be outsourced along with the technology itself. So, if the reasons companies are being acquired is for technology or talent, and often both, one only has to look at the reason why. Management outsourced, gave away and shifted their focus. No longer was it the best and the brightest who shined, but who was the best corporate politician, and who gave better PowerPoint and Excel presentations. 

Today, the best and brightest don't use the tools that big telco relies upon. They use others that cost less, work better and create more value more quickly. That all means, in the brave new world we're in today, that no matter how much smarts telcos embed in their networks, its the upstarts that create universal value, for all. Just watch as Google, Facebook and Microsoft's investments in underwater fiber further devalues the likes of those who own and control the current undersea cable world, as those new pipes won't be anything like the old pipes.......


Google Wants to Say 'Allo with New Apps and Services

Google already has Google +, but it's rolling out Spaces. They have GoogleVoice, Chat and Hangouts, but are rolling out Allo and Duo. While it's confusing to the general market, it's really a way to say that they are coming out with something totally new and not just upgrading what they had.

The reason "NEW" is part of "NEWS" so if it was simply said at Google I/O that Google is going to upgrade their existing offerings it would be a yawn instead of a boom. And, judging by all the media attention SPACES, ALLO and DUO are getting, along with other "NEW" announcements, one would have to say the positioning is working.

What Google did was get into the game where Facebook already is with Messenger and WhatsApp and now will have native apps that mirror Facetime and iMessage from Apple. Already Spaces is working on both iOS and Android, while Allo and Duo will be out later this year, likely to coincide with the arrival of the new Android OS and the new Android Nexus devices (smartphones and tablets.)

As for Spaces, the idea seems good as it feels like a "Post It" note service, complete with commentary....but for more personal, small group use vs. Google+ which is more of their Facebook alternative.

So give Google's spin doctors credit. They could have simply said "we're upgrading Hangouts" but instead their leaving Hangouts to be their Conferencing solution to rival Zoom, GoToMeeting and WebEx, while making their two new apps more about personal communications...


The Comunicano Communique for Monday May 16th, 2016

 
Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In More...  
 
 
The Comunicano Communique banner
 

The Comunicano Communique

 
 

It's Google I/O Week in Silicon Valley so the fun game to watch is how Facebook and its related entities are playing "games" with Google in the news with announcements. Watching the news flow last week and this week the gamesmanship is at an all time high, while Microsoft, Twitter and Apple all stay off to the side. In other news, the hot topics remain chat, messaging and bots, that and Yahoo getting ready to be carved up and sold off...but who will be the buyer and what are their plans? Personally, I'm more intrigued and impressed with the Amazon Private Label move. That and it's own air fleet, plus drones means money on money....Check out today's melange of news...all found in today's Comunicano Communique.

By the way, don't miss the API event of the summer in Las Vegas. "All About The API"......

 
 
  http%3A%2F%2Fstatic2.businessinsider.com%2Fimage%2F5739a81cdd08951b2e8b474a-1272-954%2Fgettyimages-450831356.jpg

Amazon is about to launch in a new $80 billion market

It looks like Amazon is getting into the food business. A new report from The Wall Street Journal claims that the online retail giant is gearing up to launch its own own-brand foodstuffs for the first time "as soon as the end of the month."
 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  http%3A%2F%2Fwww.telegraph.co.uk%2Fcontent%2Fdam%2Fnews%2F2016%2F05%2F15%2F95772239_Netflix-tablet-NEWS-xlarge_trans%2B%2BGTrH7vjUBZaHH8X-0ptmLbya3im2nePFXFN785ABZas.jpg

BBC set to launch Britflix rival to Netflix after John Whittingdale approves subscription streaming

The paragraphs were widely interpreted as an assault on the corporation's traditional funding model, with some suggesting that it marked the "beginning of the end" for the licence fee. However, John Whittingdale, the culture secretary, as well as senior BBC sources, said it was the corporation that had requested new powers to levy subscriptions.
 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  http%3A%2F%2Fcdn.static-economist.com%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Fcf_images%2Fimages-magazine%2F2016%2F05%2F14%2FWB%2F20160514_WBD001_facebook.jpg

The Slack generation

STEWART BUTTERFIELD, the boss of Slack, a messaging company, has been wonderfully unlucky in certain ventures. In 2002 he and a band of colleagues created an online-video game called "Game Neverending". It never took off, but the tools they used to design it turned into Flickr, the web's first popular photo-sharing website.
 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  https%3A%2F%2Fi2.wp.com%2Fqzprod.files.wordpress.com%2F2016%2F05%2Fmario.jpg%3Ffit%3D440%252C330%26quality%3D80%26strip%3Dall%26ssl%3D1

Nintendo is serious about making movies

Nintendo's fortunes are fading fast. In order to survive, it's heading to the multiplex. In an interview with Japan's Asahi Shimbun (link in Japanese) published today (May 16), Nintendo president Tatsumi Kimishima revealed that the company will enter the movie business.
 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  https%3A%2F%2Fstatic01.nyt.com%2Fimages%2F2016%2F05%2F16%2Fbusiness%2F16dbpix-yahoo%2F16dbpix-yahoo-facebookJumbo.jpg

Warren Buffett and Dan Gilbert Unite in Bid to Acquire Yahoo

Yahoo appears to be making progress in efforts to sell itself, despite some initial skepticism. The latest piece of evidence: Among those vying for the company is the unusual combination of the investor Warren E. Buffett and Dan Gilbert, the founder of Quicken Loans and owner of the Cleveland Cavaliers.
 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  https%3A%2F%2Fassets.bwbx.io%2Fimages%2Fusers%2FiqjWHBFdfxIU%2FiE6K_QjB1lSg%2Fv1%2F-1x-1.jpg

Google Plans to Map the Interior World in 3-D

Google already maps the world, but the internet giant has bigger plans for its next location-based technology. The Alphabet Inc. unit wants to digitally map the interiors of buildings in 3-D down to a resolution of a few inches, and make money in virtual reality along the way, through a project named Tango.
 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  http%3A%2F%2Fwww.androidpolice.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2016%2F05%2Fnexus2cee_ZNBrTcB-728x310.png

Android VR Placeholder Pops Up In The Google Play Developer Console

Yesterday we reported on a rumor that Google would unveil a new "Android VR" platform at Google I/O next week, along with a standalone headset. Today we're seeing what looks like additional evidence. Folks who sign into the Google Play Developer Console are seeing Android VR alongside Android Wear, Android TV, and Android Auto.
 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  http%3A%2F%2Fuploadvr.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2016%2F05%2FOculus-Talk2.jpg

Oculus to Devs: "Now is the time to be thinking about VR"

Oculus VR has issued the statement to developers that "now is the time to be thinking about VR" at its talk at Digital Dragons 2016.
 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  http%3A%2F%2Fs1.ibtimes.com%2Fsites%2Fwww.ibtimes.com%2Ffiles%2F2015%2F12%2F31%2Fwhatsapp-down.jpg

WhatsApp Desktop Apps For Mac And Windows Launched To Take On Skype

With over 1 billion users, it is already the world's most popular messaging service, but WhatsApp is now seeking to extend its reach by offering its users access to most of its features on Windows and Mac computers.
 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  http%3A%2F%2Fcdn03.androidauthority.net%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2016%2F05%2FWhatsApp-video-calling.jpg

WhatsApp preparing to roll out video calling to beta users

A beta version of WhatsApp for Android included the option to initiate a video call. The feature was not active for most users, and it was removed with a later update, but it's a sign that the full release of the feature is approaching.Video calling for WhatsApp has been in the works for at least six months - back in December, screenshots of the iOS version of the app leaked showing a basic video calling interface.
 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  https%3A%2F%2Fmedia.today.ng%2Fmain%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2016%2F05%2Ftelegram.jpg

Telegram now lets you edit messages after you've sent them " TODAY.ng

Telegram has released an update to its communication app that now lets you edit your messages after they've been sent. This feature works across all chat types including with groups and individual conversations. Other features that have been added include being able to mention anyone in group chats, finding people faster with a new search list, and having a better way to add bots to conversations.
 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  http%3A%2F%2Fstatic.theglobeandmail.ca%2F07f%2Freport-on-business%2Fsmall-business%2Fsb-growth%2Farticle30027711.ece%2FALTERNATES%2Fw620%2Fwirkin.jpg

As app growth slows, tech companies bet 'bots' will be next big thing

It's a strange thing to be interviewed for a job by a robot on your phone. The robot in question in this case is Wirk'n, a chat "bot" found within the popular messaging app Kik. Bots are quasi-intelligent automated programs you "talk" to by text, the same way you might with a friend or relative.
 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  http%3A%2F%2Fsi.wsj.net%2Fpublic%2Fresources%2Fimages%2FBN-OA557_0515_C_P_20160515223508.jpg

AT&T Employees Automate Repetitive Tasks with Software Bots

Over the past year, some workers at AT&T Inc. have begun to automate the boring, repetitive parts of their jobs by using software bots. AT&T is just one of many companies beginning to use software bots to free workers from mundane tasks such as entering information into legacy systems. Sales people at AT&T, for example, now have a bot that automatically pulls sales leads from multiple systems, freeing up hours tospend instead with customers.
 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  https%3A%2F%2Fstatic01.nyt.com%2Fimages%2F2016%2F05%2F14%2Fbusiness%2F16socialmedia1%2F16socialmedia1-facebookJumbo.jpg

Social Media Finds New Roles as News and Entertainment Curators

By the end of last week, Mark Zuckerberg said that Facebook would conduct "a full investigation" into accusations that editors at the company prevented news stories from conservative outlets from appearing in a section of the social network's service.
 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  https%3A%2F%2Fwww.runwaygirlnetwork.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2016%2F05%2FK64126-1.jpg

Chinese airlines begin to install Wi-Fi beyond trial basis - Runway Girl

As airlines based in the United States are wrapping up their inflight Wi-Fi rollouts - and eyeing nextgen upgrades - and many European airlines have finally decided on equipage plans, there's one massive country with a booming aviation industry that remains largely disconnected.
 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
     
 
  http%3A%2F%2Frethink-wireless.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2016%2F05%2Fsoftbank.jpg

Wall Street unconvinced by Softbank's optimism about Sprint

Sprint's owner, Softbank of Japan, is standing by its troubled US child, with founder Masayoshi Son saying that Sprint's radical capex cuts helped boost its parent's operating margins by 8.8% in its just-finished fiscal year. "Cost cutting is going smoothly at Sprint," said Son during an analyst call.
 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  https%3A%2F%2Fthink.storage.googleapis.com%2Fimages%2F6-questions-for-every-brand-to-consider-after-brandcast-lg.png

6 Questions for Every Brand to Consider After YouTube Brandcast

Every NewFronts season, the major players in digital content pitch their programming to advertisers. With those pitches comes a dizzying amount of new research and data. Below are six questions to help you gauge if you're making the most of your online video strategy, along with the newest YouTube data announced at the sixth annual Brandcast event.
 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 


We hope you are enjoying The Comunicano Daily. If you want to share it with friends, colleagues and co-workers, or even your wife, child or even someone you don't like, please do. They can join by visiting The Comunicano Daily signup page: http://eepurl.com/BFXkD

 

The Comunicano Communique for Monday May 9th, 2016

 
Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In More...  
 
 
The Comunicano Communique banner
 

The Comunicano Communique

 
 

This past week and weekend I was back and forth over the weekend to San Diego and kicking around L.A. as part of my "see what's what where" experiment.  What i was amazed at was traffic and how bad it was being reported using various tech tools. Beyond Waze and Google Maps, my GPS equipped Audi has traffic reporting built in.

Literally what was supposed to be a less than two hour drive south at 10 AM turned into an almost three hour jaunt as "hazardous driving conditions" were reported from the moment I hit Irvine, CA. About the only hazards I saw were the other drivers who seem to have all been experiencing first time on a freeway. Cars at 55 in the fast lanes. Minivans changing lanes without turn signals and just a bunch of unattended construction locations. And, if I thought traffic was bad going south, it was worse going north. Then there was the seemingly unneeded full stops by the CHP that I saw in a few locations.....making me wonder what was up.

But once back in L.A. it was Uber for me. And, what I'm finding is that the Uber drivers who use Waze are far more switched on than those that use Google Maps, and those that use both, and who take their time to check the route options, are they ever earning their 5 stars from me. 

My point here is that the travel routing technologies are really getting better, but now it's more about the drivers getting hip to what they can do to be driving better and arriving at their destinations more safely.

So read today's Comunicano Communique and get into the news.

By the way, don't miss the API event of the summer in Las Vegas. "All About The API"......

 
 
 

Hyperloop Transportation says it will use a ‘cheaper, safer’ form of magnetic levitation

 
  Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, one of two LA-based startups working to build Elon Musk's futuristic transportation system, announced today that it has licensed a technology called "passive magnetic levitation" to power its prototype. The system is "a cheaper, safer alternative" to regular magnetic levitation, or maglev, which is currently in operation powering high-speed trains in China and Europe.  
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  http%3A%2F%2Fcdn2.ubergizmo.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2016%2F02%2FAndroidWear-DesignedForYourWrist-640x315.jpg

Google I/O 2016: What To Expect

Google's annual developer conference is just around the corner. Every year the company welcomes developers from across the globe to showcase its software, services, and devices. It goes without saying that the next major Android update is going to be formally announced at this event and the company might also announce some major improvements to Chrome OS.
 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  http%3A%2F%2Fmedia.dailygazette.com%2Fgraphics%2Fdesign%2Ficon3Dshadow.png

Ads evolve into new forms as media landscape shifts

Peter Naylor, head of advertising sales at Hulu, stood on a stage before a roomful of advertising executives who were there to see what the popular streaming service had in store for the year. After trumpeting Hulu's new interactive ads, Naylor made another pitch.
 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  https%3A%2F%2Ftctechcrunch2011.files.wordpress.com%2F2016%2F05%2Fpaypal.jpg%3Fw%3D764%26h%3D400%26crop%3D1

PayPal nixes Purchase Protection for payments made through crowdfunding platforms

If you use your PayPal account to support a crowdfunding campaign, you can't rely on its Purchase Protection plan anymore. The payment platform has announced that after June 25, payments made on crowdfunding platforms will no longer be eligible for the program, which allows users to open disputes for items that don't arrive or are different from described.
 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  https%3A%2F%2Fs0.wp.com%2Fwp-content%2Fthemes%2Fvip%2Ftechcrunch-2013%2Fassets%2Fimages%2Ftechcrunch.opengraph.default.png

Opera brings its free VPN service to iOS with a new app, Opera VPN

Following the launch of a built-in VPN service in its web browser last month, Opera this morning debuted a free and unlimited mobile VPN app for iOS devices. Called Opera VPN, the app is designed to protect users' privacy - it removes ad blockers, for example - but it's also marketed towards those who want a way to work around restricted internet access, such on networks managed by I.T.
 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  http%3A%2F%2Ftbivision.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2016%2F01%2FVR-Thommo.png
NBC Sports in VR first

NBC Sports Group made its first steps into virtual reality broadcasting at the weekend by airing VR footage from the Kentucky Derby, in partnership with NextVR. The companies claimed that Saturday's coverage marked the "first-ever horse racing in virtual reality" with footage captured "from the paddock to the track and...

 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  http%3A%2F%2Fwww.androidheadlines.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2016%2F05%2FManus-VR_1.png
Manus VR Gloves Add A New Dimension To The HTC Vive 

There are certain technical challenges that need to be overcome in order to deliver a good virtual reality experience; some more crucial than others. Two of the most important characteristics contributing to an immersive VR experience lie in good optics for a pleasant visual experience overall, and the VR system's motion tracking capabilities.

 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  http%3A%2F%2Fwww.gannett-cdn.com%2F-mm-%2Fb5586d4fa7f2c91060b60dfc955f65c02a4b1988%2Fc%3D142-0-2163-1142%26r%3Dx633%26c%3D1200x630%2Flocal%2F-%2Fmedia%2F2016%2F04%2F29%2FUSATODAY%2FUSATODAY%2F635975436749007299-XXX-XXX-IMG-635787108271076723-G-1-1-ADC1RL2S-76535018.JPG

Personal digital assistants are on the rise (and they want to talk)

NEW YORK-You may already be on a first-name basis with Siri, Cortana, Google or Alexa, the Fab Four of voice-activated digital assistants. Now that relationship is expanding from one device (typically a smartphone) to many. The major tech companies are putting these digital assistants, powered by artificial intelligence algorithms and activated by voice, into multiple products.
 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  http%3A%2F%2F1u88jj3r4db2x4txp44yqfj1.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2016%2F03%2Ftaytweets-780x392.png

Don't crash and burn with your bot: 6 best practices

With Facebook's introduction of bots on Messenger last month, chatbots, which have been around for decades, have suddenly taken the leap from fun toy project to cutting-edge business proposition. With this rapid rise to prominence, it's critical to differentiate the hype from the true value bots can offer when you consider using one for your business.
 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  http%3A%2F%2Fedge.alluremedia.com.au%2Fm%2Fl%2F2016%2F05%2F2015-bot-traffic-report-lowres.png

Are Bots Good Or Bad For Online Business?

Bots tend to get a lot of bad press. And considering that bots tend to be involved in all kinds of malicious internet activity - including devastating DDoS attacks - it isn't altogether unwarranted. However, the actual story behind bots isn't quite so one-sided. Robot image from Shutterstock Think of your website as a garden.
 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  https%3A%2F%2Fs0.wp.com%2Fi%2Fblank.jpg

Tech cafe: Comrade bot

The spotlight shines brightly on American companies Tesla and Google X (Alphabet, Inc), even the government contender, DARPA, and education/research institutes like the MIT, when it comes to autonomous and guided bots. From self-driving cars to military UAVs, the robotics universe is expanding with technology and innovation coalescing to fulfil a need, and few would disagree that nowhere is this more pronounced than in the US.
 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  http%3A%2F%2Fcdn.slashgear.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2016%2F05%2F911-missing-cellphone.jpg

Finally there's a chat bot for calling 911

We are now living in the age of chat bots. Whether they be tied to apps like Slack or Facebook Messenger, chat bots have eliminated the need for users to take car of annoying, time-consuming tasks, such as translating photos, requesting a ride home, ordering tacos, and even posting offensive tweets.
 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  http%3A%2F%2Fi1.wp.com%2Fwww.geektime.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2016%2F05%2FGogovan-scores-new-funds-from-Alibabas-venture-arm-e1462540600853.png%3Fresize%3D750%252C454

Alibaba invests in Hong Kong startup GoGoVan

On-demand logistics startup GogoVan raised a series C funding round, it announced today. The funding amount is undisclosed, but is described as "a decent amount for future business expansion." The round was led by private equity firm New Horizon Capital and was joined by Singapore Press Holdings, Hotung Investment Holdings, and existing investors.
 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  https%3A%2F%2Fi2.wp.com%2Fwww.runwaygirlnetwork.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2016%2F05%2F26111913854_14e33c0f9f_o.jpg%3Fresize%3D5568%252C3712%26ssl%3D1
Delta tries radio tags so passengers and luggage arrive together

At a news conference at Delta Air Lines headquarters in Atlanta last week, I remembered an old joke about a skyjacker who demanded that the pilots "take me where my luggage is going".

 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  http%3A%2F%2Fwww.insidesources.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2016%2F05%2Fbigstock-Aerial-View-Of-The-Tractor-91687778-300x300.jpg

Feds on Verge of Slowing Innovation Again

With the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit expected to rule on the Federal Communications Commission's internet regulations any day now, it's hard to believe none of the presidential candidates or more media outlets have acknowledged the agency's rules could seriously alter the internet as we know it.
 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
 

 
  https%3A%2F%2Fkickofflabs.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2014%2F07%2Fcontently.jpg

10 Examples of Remarkable Landing Page Copy

Your landing page will succeed or fail based on the written copy. No matter how well designed your page is... if the copy sucks... no one is going to buy it. Great copy rises above the design to convert visitors into leads. What makes for great landing page copy?
 
 

[continue...]

Facebook Twitter Google+ Linked-In
 
     


We hope you are enjoying The Comunicano Daily. If you want to share it with friends, colleagues and co-workers, or even your wife, child or even someone you don't like, please do. They can join by visiting The Comunicano Daily signup page: http://eepurl.com/BFXkD